Dr Javid Musevi, D.M.D et associés

Clinique Dentaire Dentwest

5890 Ave de Monkland, Suite 10, QC Montréal H4A 1G2

Dentistry

Dr. Javid Musevi et Associes strives to provide the most effective dental care and treatment possible, utilizing only state of the art techniques and patient practices. We provide our patients with a comprehensive spectrum of dental care and treatment services.

The procedures that we do offer to our patients include:

Dental Check-up

Regular dental check ups are the best way to make sure your gums and teeth stay healthy. The check-up allows your dentist to diagnose any problems, and to take preventive action to stop problems before they develop. Regular dental check-ups are the best way to make sure your gums and teeth stay healthy. The check-up allows your dentist to diagnose any problems, and to take preventive action to stop problems before they develop. Your dentist is trained to look for anything unusual in your mouth, throat and neck, including the oral manifestations of diseases, oral cancer, infections, the early signs of gum disease, eroded fillings and dental decay.

Your dentist understands the treatment alternatives available to you, and can help you make informed decisions about your dental care. But you have a role to play too in preventing many of the common dental problems associated with growing older.

Brush and floss your teeth properly, visit your dentist regularly for a professional cleaning, check-up and necessary treatment, and update your dentist on your medical history, including any new medication you are taking.

Cleaning

Professional cleaning is the only way to remove hardened deposits of tar from your teeth. If tar  is not removed, it can cause gum disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

Cleaning also smoothes and polishes the surfaces of your teeth and your fillings so they are less likely to accumulate plaque (the invisible bacterial film that builds up on teeth every day). Finally, cleaning removes stains and mild discolourations, so your teeth look better.

A good cleaning can take some time, but it's time well spent. A cleaning by your dentist or dental hygienist helps to prevent gum disease, one of the most common adult dental problems.

Fillings

To fill a cavity, your dentist may first give you "freezing" (or local anesthetic), so you do not feel any pain. Your dentist then takes out all traces of decay, shapes the hole and fills it.

Most fillings are done in two ways:

1. Direct Filling - These fillings go right into the cavity, after your dentist has cleaned out the decay. Amalgam (or silver) fillings and plastic (or white) fillings are examples of direct fillings. They harden quickly. Most of the time, you will be able to have a direct filling put in place in one appointment.

2. Indirect Filling - Examples of this type of filling are crowns (or caps) and inlays. They are custom made in a lab to fit your tooth. Your dentist cements the filling in place. Most indirect fillings take two or more appointments to complete.

Dental amalgam is the best-known direct material. Cast gold alloy is the most durable indirect material. However, ceramics are gaining in popularity because of their longevity relative to other tooth-coloured materials.

Crowns and Bridges

Crowns

If your tooth is damaged but not lost, a crown (also called a cap) can be used to cover the damaged part of your tooth. A crown protects your tooth from further damage.

You may need a crown if:

  • You have a root canal
  • You have a large filling in a tooth
  • You have a broken tooth
  • Your tooth is badly stained, not the right shape or out of line

Crowns can be made of different kinds of metals, porcelain or porcelain fused to metal. They are strong and last for about 10 years, if you take good care of them. Brush and floss your crown, just like you clean your natural teeth.

Bridges

If a tooth is lost, it is important to replace it with a false (or artificial) tooth as soon as possible. This procedure will prevent your remaining teeth from drifting out of line and causing other problems.

A bridge is also called a "fixed bridge" or a "fixed partial denture." A bridge can replace one or more missing teeth and is held firmly in place by healthy teeth on each side of the missing one(s). You cannot take a bridge out. It is permanent.

Dental Implants

Dental implants are used to replace missing roots and support replacement teeth, which may be fixed to the implant(s).

Implants are not for everyone. You must be in good general health, have healthy gums and enough bone in your jaw to support the implant(s). You must be willing to see your dentist or dental specialist several times until the work is done, and take very good care of your implant(s). In addition, implants can cost more than other kinds of replacement teeth.

It's normal for bone to shrink if it no longer has teeth to support. Because an implant sticks to bone, the bone is less likely to shrink. But if you have been missing teeth for some time, you may have lost bone. A bone graft can build up the bone so it can support an implant. When a bone graft is done, bone is added to the area where your jawbone has shrunk.

Root Canal Treatment

Also called endodontics, root canal treatment is the process of removing the infected, injured or dead pulp from a tooth.

Teeth are made up of three hard layers:

  • Enamel
  • Dentin
  • Cementum

There is a space inside the hard layers of each tooth. It is called the root canal system and it is filled with soft dental pulp made up of nerves and blood vessels that help the tooth grow and develop. Once a tooth is fully-grown, it can survive without a pulp. The pulp inside a tooth can be damaged by cracks in the tooth, deep cavities or accidents. Germs (or bacteria) can get into the tooth and lead to infected tooth pulp. This situation may cause pain and/or swelling. Sometimes, the pulp becomes infected or dies, but does not cause any pain. If the pulp of a tooth becomes infected, a root canal (or endodontic treatment) is needed. When this treatment is performed, the pulp is removed.

Dentures

There are two types of dentures: partial and full dentures. Both types are made in a dental lab, based on a mold (or an impression) of your mouth. A partial denture is also called a "removable partial denture" or a "partial." It is made up of one or more false teeth, and held in place by clasps that fit onto nearby teeth. You can take the partial denture out yourself, for cleaning and at night. A partial denture may be used when nearby teeth are not strong enough to hold a bridge, or when more than just a few teeth are missing.

A full denture is also called a "complete denture" or "false teeth." It can be used when all your natural teeth are missing. Remember, you need to care for a denture as carefully as you would look after your natural teeth.

Bonding & Veneers

Bonding and veneers make your teeth look better by changing their colour, shape or spacing.

Bonding

Bonding is a quick and painless way to repair chips in your teeth. Bonding uses a white plastic paste, called composite resin - a plastic that is semi-liquid at first, but that becomes hard and durable when cured with light.

This material can be tinted to match the colour of natural teeth and can also be contoured and shaped to resemble the missing part of a chipped tooth. It can be painted over a stained tooth, and it can make a fractured tooth look whole and perfect. Composite resin can even build up the size of teeth so gaps between them are reduced or eliminated.

Veneers

Veneers are very thin acrylic or porcelain shells that are attached to the front part of teeth. Like bonding, veneers can cover badly-stained teeth, chipped teeth, uneven teeth and large fillings.

Tooth Whitening

In most cases, the natural colour of teeth is within a range of light greyish-yellow shades. Teeth naturally darken with age and their appearance can be affected by the accumulation of surface stains acquired from the use of tobacco products and the consumption of certain foods or drinks.

In addition, the perception of the colour of teeth is severely affected by skin tone and make-up. Independent of the real colour of their teeth, people with darker skin or who use dark makeup will look like they have brighter teeth.

Although teeth are not naturally meant to be completely white, many Canadians want a brighter smile. Responding to this desire, a wide range of "whitening" options has become available to consumers. These products fall into two main categories: surface whiteners and bleaches.

Surface Whiteners

These products use special abrasives to improve the product's ability to remove surface stains. Most products in this category are either toothpastes or chewing gums. Because the special abrasives in these whitening products are often only finer versions of what is used in regular toothpastes, they are unlikely to cause excessive tooth wear.

However, the effectiveness of these products is limited to surface stains and should not be used as a substitute for professional cleaning.

Bleaches

Most bleaching products are peroxide-based and are actually capable of altering the colours of the tooth itself. However, not all tooth discolourations respond to tooth-bleaching treatments. Individuals contemplating tooth-bleaching should consult with a dentist to determine the cause of the tooth discolouration and to determine whether a bleaching treatment will have the desired result.

This step is especially important for patients with fillings, root canal treatments, crowns and/or with extremely dark stains on the anterior teeth.

A number of different bleaching techniques and products are available to patients :

  • Vital bleaching is done on "living" teeth and can be used to whiten your teeth if they have become stained by food or tobacco, or if they have become dark with age.

  • Non-vital bleaching is bleaching done on teeth that are no longer "alive." If your tooth has changed colour because of a root canal, non-vital bleaching can lighten your tooth from the inside out.

There are three methods for bleaching teeth. The method that will work best for you depends on the number of teeth that need to be bleached, and on how badly they are stained (or discoloured).

  • Putting a special bleach on your stained teeth and using heat (or heat and light) to start the bleaching action
  • Wearing a custom-made mouthguard filled with a special bleach for part of each day
  • Brushing with a special bleach mixed in toothpaste

Dental Emergencies

Here are some common dental emergencies and how to handle them.

Toothache

First call your dentist. Explain your symptoms and ask to be seen as soon as possible. Then ease the pain. Take an over-the-counter pain medicine that works for you, but do not put the pills on your sore tooth. Hold an ice pack against your face at the spot of the sore tooth.

Do not put a heating pad, a hot water bottle, or any other source of heat on your jaw. Heat will make things worse instead of better.

Chipped or broken tooth

Broken teeth can almost always be saved. Call your dentist and explain what happened. He or she will see you right away. If it's a small break, your dentist may use a white filling to fix the tooth. If the break is serious, a root canal may be needed. Your tooth may also need a crown (also called a cap).

Knocked out tooth

If the knocked-out tooth is an adult (or permanent) tooth, your dentist may be able to put it back. You must act quickly. If the tooth is put back in place within 10 minutes, it has a fair chance of taking root again. After 2 hours, the chances are poor.

If the tooth looks clean, put it back in its place (its socket). If this is not possible, or if there's a chance that the tooth might be swallowed, put it in a container of cold milk. Go to your dentist, or to the nearest dentist, right away. If you get help within ten minutes, there is a fair chance that the tooth will take root again.

Badly bitten lip or tongue

If there is bleeding, press down on the part of the mouth that is bleeding. Use a clean cloth to do this. If the lip is swollen, use an ice pack to keep the swelling down. If the bleeding does not stop, go to Emergency at a hospital right away. First, try using dental floss, very gently and carefully, to remove the object. Never poke between your teeth with a pin or similar sharp, pointy object; it can cut your gums or scratch the tooth surface. If you can't get the object out, see your dentist.

Lost filling

Put a piece of softened sugarless chewing gum in the spot where the filling was lost. This will protect the area for a short period of time. See a dentist as soon as possible.

Source: Canadian Dental Association